#WeStandReady with extra people power, if needed, behind our power restoration efforts for you

Power restoration after severe weather: It's a tough job, but #WeStandReady.

Power restoration after severe weather: It’s a tough job, but #WeStandReady.

TECO’s line workers – and our team members in related roles – are a tough, smart bunch. They complete years of rigorous physical and classroom training. They make safety their top priority as they work to keep the community’s lights on. And they’re experts at a wide range of equipment critical to maintaining a reliable power grid. When they graduate from our renowned training program, ready to take their places on the front lines of the electrical system, we want the community to know about it.

But in a worst-case scenario, it’s nice to know they – along with our skilled and valuable Customer Care professionals – have help. For electric system repairs, TECO is a member of the Southeastern Electric Exchange, a consortium of electric utilities that can come to each other’s aid for restoration through a mutual assistance pact. For customer service, our Mutual Assistance Routing System enables customer service professionals at other utilities to step in to help you.

Just a few of the guys who keep power flowing to the community, this photo is from the 2017 Journeyman Lineman Graduation at The Columbia Restaurant in Ybor City.

Just a few of the professionals who keep power flowing to the community, this photo is from the 2017 Journeyman Lineman Graduation at The Columbia Restaurant in Ybor City. Here, linemen and substation electricians pose with TECO leaders and trainers.

It’s all part of how communities come together in times of widespread need. Fortunately for the Tampa Bay area, our crews and customer service professionals have spent more time in recent years helping other communities than welcoming help here. This work has taken our people from the Bahamas to places reeling from something Florida so rarely sees: snow.

But with Hurricane Irma looming, that could change. And if it does, you can expect to see workers from other utilities in neighborhoods across our service area. These crews have our full respect and confidence and they deserve yours as well – along with a hearty thanks. With their commitment to safety and ours, they’ll wait until winds fall below 40 mph to handle repairs. This is critical when it comes to minimizing risk of injuries.

In 2013, then-U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez, flanked here by Bill Whale to the left and Gordon Gillette, right, visits apprentice linemen in training at the Skills Training Center. (Our training regimen is the real deal, in other words.)

In 2013, then-U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez, flanked here by Bill Whale to the left and Gordon Gillette, right, visits apprentice linemen in training at the Skills Training Center. (Our training regimen is the real deal, in other words.)

We work year-round to prepare for hurricane season, and our commitment to you and the entire community knows no bounds – it’s why we’re here. If other utilities are here helping us, it means we’re working through the aftermath of severe weather too. Nobody wants that, it goes without saying…but if it happens, we’re proud to have the help of other professionals alongside ours.

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